Bishakh Som

Bishakh Som

Bishakh’s comics have appeared in The Other Side: An Anthology of Queer Paranormal Romance, The Boston Review, The Brooklyn Rail, Buzzfeed, Ink Brick, The Huffington Post, The Graphic Canon and the Eisner and Harvey-winning anthology Little Nemo: Dream Another Dream. They received the prestigious Xeric grant in 2003 for their comics collection Angel and have illustrated The Prefab Bathroom: An Architectural History, published by McFarland Press.

Bishakh’s artwork was featured in solo shows at ArtLexis Gallery and Jaya Yoga Center, and in group shows at the Bannister Gallery at Rhode Island College, Issyra Gallery, Grady Alexis Gallery and the Society of Illustrators. They have presented their comics work at The Poetry Project and at the New York Comics & Picture-story Symposium at The New School.

“As a TGNC artist of color, I feel beyond fortunate to be able to participate in the TDOR culture shift project – a chance for artists, organizers, writers and TGNC people of all stripes to collaborate and create, to celebrate and remember all our ancestors and siblings.”

Edxie Betts

Edxie Betts

Edxie Betts is a Black Pilipin@ BlackFoot Queer Trans Gender Non Conforming Anti-authoritarian Femme neuro-divergent, autonomous organizer, political cultural producer, and liberation artist.

They often present and workshop at different schools/events throughout the kkkountry to raise awareness of their collective work, lived struggles, decolonial struggle and the power of reclaiming collective consent. Their existing work consists of critical self-collective reflection, bringing support and attention to political prisoners, restorative mediation work and emphasizing art as cultural production for the sake of inspiring healing, counter narrative, oppositional alternatives, collective liberation through autonomous self-organizing and direct action.

“For me, this project is a great way for us as TGNC folx of color to shift the struggles and tragedies many of us face into powerful reimaginings and meaningful experiences that illuminate our collective resilience. It’s so very important for our stories to be seen and heard. Once upon a time before colonization we were seen as sacred contributors to our ancestral communities. What strengths would our futures hold if we took into account the values of our torrid and colonized past?”

Matice Moore

Matice Moore

Matice Moore is a Black queer gender non-conforming artist and educator born and raised in Arizona, who currently resides in Oakland. By day they support the advocacy and activism of youth who’ve been impacted by parental incarceration. By night, Matice uses linoleum and sparkly pens to make liberatory images that affirm marginalized identities with an emphasis on Black people, queerness, and trans identities. Matice’s art can be found here, through a collaborative initiative with trans activist and sex-worker advocate, Monica Jones. Most profits from the shop are donated to Black artists, organizers, and organizations working for Black liberation. By day they support the advocacy and activism of youth who’ve been impacted by parental incarceration through Project WHAT!

“Participating in the Trans Day of Resilience culture shift project challenged me to think more deeply about gender justice and freed my spirit to vision alternative futures with other artists and organizers. The process was cathartic, and it was an honor to conceive and create art in honor of the liberatory work being done by Gender Justice LA. My work will forever be changed for the better.”

Micah Bazant

Micah Bazant

Micah Bazant is a visual artist who works with social justice organizers to make change look irresistible. Micah creates art inspired by struggles to decolonize ourselves from white supremacy, patriarchy, ableism and the gender binary. They are also an anti-zionist jew and identify as timtum (one of six jewish gender categories). Shop

“I love this project. It’s an honor to work together and build new ways of transforming the world through art and organizing. This project is an offering to all our trans ancestors who fought and died before seeing this moment, and to all our siblings yet to come who will be freer than we can even imagine.”

Asia-Vinae Palmer

Asia-Vinae Palmer

Asia-Vinae J Palmer, AKA Preach has known they’ve had something to say from a young age. Born in California, aged in Eunice, Louisiana, and seasoned in New Orleans, they welcome change and work towards growth. With a writer for a mother and a painter for a father, art and literature played a big role in Asia-Vinae’s upbringing. As a visual artist, Asia-Vinae is determined to get their messages out with love and light and to use their art as seeds for something much bigger than themselves.

“Art is how I communicate – to myself and to the world. Initially, I wasn’t sure what I wanted to say about this project. I don’t identify as Trans, but being gender non-conforming is a big part of my life. I had to put away my self criticism and trust that BreakOut, my partner organization, reached out to me for a reason. For me, this project challenges me to trust my brilliance and celebrate the self-love and communal love within the community. I’m often unsure if my ideas are “right” or “good enough” but I knew I wanted to create something bright. I feel tied to this project because it serves as a way to archive my community, what we look like, how we interact with each other, and how we unapologetically exist. Give us our roses while we’re still here AND we love ourselves and each other enough to flower crown ourselves instead of waiting for acceptance and support. I believe that art is magical and whatever I create will take on a sort of immortality. If I’m going to make something with the intention of it living forever then I want it to be beautiful and bring on the manifestation of light.”

Rommy Torrico

Rommy Torrico

Rommy Torrico is a DACAmented, queer, trans (non binary), nonwhite artist and activist born in Iquique, Chile and currently residing in Jersey City. They have been involved in the (im)migrant rights struggle for several years and infuse much of their work with personal experience and the stories their community shares. Rommy is part of a grassroots initiative, the Collier County Neighborhood Stories Project, which believes in the strength our communities have and how powerful stories can really be. Shop

“This is my second year being part of this project and I’m in awe of the beauty and power that has come from it and from this incredible culture of nurturing; a culture where artists, cultural workers, organizers and community intentionally invest in each other, work together, learn from each other, and move in tandem to imagine what our liberation can look like and how to get there. As TGNC artists, this has meant finding kin wherever you go and being reminded that we’ve been here, in all our ways, and we will continue to exist and define ourselves beyond the scope of society, institutions, systems. It means bringing ourselves forth as authentically as possible, with all our complexities, and never compromising for less. It means allowing myself to transcend beyond what limits me and trying to live in that place for as long as I can.”

Wriply Bennet

Wriply Bennet

Wriply Marie Bennet is a painter and illustrator, born and raised in Ohio. She uses her art to uplift her sisters in the black lives/ black transgender lives movement. She works in ink, watercolor and other mediums, and her art comes from an untrained perspective. She never aspired to attend college to study art, and there are no degrees to speak of other than a high school diploma. Her art is proudly self-taught. Wriply’s art has been used in countless social justice flyers, and in the film MAJOR!, a documentary at the 2015 San Francisco Transgender Film Festival.Wriply is much more than a visual artist; she’s also a singer/song writer, actor, screenplay writer, story teller, cartoonist, and fashion designer. She continues to work and fight for justice! For art will travel.

“Being part of this project means that we are gathering. We are spreading our energies & our culture amongst the masses. This project is a great way to have a platform to introduce all people to trans women and trans life, and it is extremely important trans women are able to mediate this conversation. Mediation through art is one of the most beautiful ways we can transmit our own lives.”